Navigating the cacophonous streets of New York City can be daunting process for practically anyone -- and for people who wear hearing aids, the task has long been made more difficult by constant background noise and a lack of infrastructure to make the process easier.

Fortunately, there's an easy solution -- hearing loops, which allow wireless connectivity to hearing aids with telecoils, effectively transmitting sound from its source directly to the hearing aid, and mitigating the effect of background noise. Unfortunately, adoption of hearing loops, which are widespread in Europe, has been painfully slow.

Until recently, that is. Largely thanks to the founder of the Hearing Access Program, Janice Schacter, New Yorkers are benefiting from increased accommodations for hearing aids:

Following a successful pilot program, the Taxi and Limousine commission announced that it had approved the induction loop technology for voluntary installation across all TLC-related industries, including taxi cabs. The transition to 100% looped taxis (which London has enjoyed since 1998) was accelerate when it was announced that New York's "taxis of tomorrow" will all have induction loops to help people with hearing aids communicate more easily with their drivers.

In addition to taxis, the Hearing Access Program has brought hearing loops to such public spaces as the New York Historical Society, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the new Yankee Stadium.

Additionally, the Hearing Access Program spearheaded a drive to install hearing loops at all of New York's ~450 subway stations, which is now complete.

Finally, the hearing aids on the subways have been getting some extra attention lately from the New York City Department of Health, with advertisements that caution headphone users to turn down their music to avoid permanent hearing loss. It's worth noting that Starkey, a hearing aid manufacturer, helped funds these advertisements, and deserves praise for its role.

We think New York City is mostly on the right track recently with hearing aids -- hearing loss should be prevented where possible, and people with hearing aids deserve to benefit from hearing loop systems in public spaces wherever possible. We wish that New York and other governments could see fit to bring resources to bear on making hearing aids more affordable -- but at least for now, it looks like it's up to private companies to play this role.